The American Heartland’s Declining Drug Abuse

Iowa with its rolling hills of fertile black dirt producing acre after acre of prairie grass, corn and a host of other products consumed by the rest of America has something to be proud these days. Regrettably these same farmlands were a hotbed of clandestine meth lab activity just a few years ago. Now, Iowa, The American Heartland, has something to be proud of when it comes to drug abuse statistics.

Iowa has long been known for its struggles with methamphetamine. In 2005 methamphetamine abuse and addiction were running rampant with wild abandon. Meth lab incidents reached staggering amounts totaling 1437 that year but things have since changed dramatically. Since the enactment of the Federal Combating Methamphetamine Epidemic Act (CMEA) and similar state laws to control the sale of pseudoephedrine (PSE) went into action meth lab incidents in Iowa plummeted to just 181 in 2007. 181 meth labs are still far too many but you have to admit the impressive improvement.

Obviously very creative drug abusers, dealers and meth “cooks” will find new ways of obtaining the key ingredient and in 2007 a new method called “smurfing” came into play. As a result from 2007-2009 meth lab incidents jumped 48%. Still yet Iowa’s meth related incidents remain relatively low in comparison to just a few years ago. Nationwide meth lab incidents increased 76% during that same two-year period.

Overall Iowa’s decreasing drug abuse statistics stand out from the rest of the country. According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) 8.02 % of American citizens abused an illicit drug in the past 30 days. This same report indicates just 4.08% of Iowa residents participated in past month drug abuse. Abuse of illicit drugs other than marijuana is also lower in Iowa as 1.81% of Iowa citizens are reported to have participated compared to the national average of 3.58%.

Prescription drug addiction is a major concern in the United States. To help combat the problem the Iowa Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PMP) went into effect in 2009. The new system enables physicians and pharmacists to access vital information concerning patient’s abuse and drug diversion of these controlled substances.

Iowa still has others areas of concern with marijuana being most widely abused drug and accounting for 7273 (26%) of the overall treatment admissions in 2009. Still yet these numbers compared to other states and the rest of the country as a whole are something to be proud of.

The Latest Child Abuse Statistics

There are several agencies in the country reporting child abuse statistics. These organizations are trying to track trends and find out ways to stop child abuse wherever possible. Child abuse statistics are used to determine where and to whom social resources should be directed.

For example, child abuse statistics state that four children in the US die every day as a result of child abuse. Three out of four were under the age of four. This number has been steadily rising over the years. This all means that there may need to be more resources like crisis nurseries for parents of children who are under the age of four. There may need to be more education on abuse when the parents take the baby home as so many young children are affected. Many experts feel like the rise in statistics is because of an increase in the population and an increase in reporting these cases.

Child abuse statistics also indicate that a report of child abuse is made every ten seconds. Perhaps there should be more call-in facilities for desperate parents who need relief from issues related to abusing their children. Such call-in centers could be anonymous and could offer crisis counseling for parents who just don’t know where to turn.

Somewhat surprising child abuse statistics state that children under the age of twelve years who are raped have perpetrators they know up to 90 percent of the time. Education for children can help give them the resources they need to tell someone about the abuse, especially cases where the abuse occurs over time. Having a counselor or trusted person at school to talk to would increase the chances that the child will tell his or her “secrets” to someone who can do something about it.

Child abuse statistics state that child abuse crosses ethnic, socioeconomic and religious lines. No group of people is exempt from child abuse. This may mean that religious figures must be aware of the possibility that someone in their congregation is having problems associated with abuse of their children. Emergency room doctors must be just as suspicious of a child of a well to do family having a broken bone as they do a child of poor parents.

Child abuse statistics affect adult as well. Up to 37% of female prison inmates and 14% of male prison inmates were once victims of child abuse. These rates are higher than the average population and it may indicate that child abuse promotes later illegal activity in adulthood.

Child abuse statistics state that children of sexual abuse are more than twice as likely that average to abuse alcohol. They are also more than 3.8 times likely to abuse drugs. In may mean that drug and alcohol abuse centers may need to deal with child sexual abuse issues before the person can really recover from their addiction issues.

Child abuse statistics inform us that a third of all abuse victims go on to abuse their own children. The cycle of abuse can only be stopped if people recover from their own issues before they have their own children.

Washington State Drug Abuse Statistics

Washington Drug Addiction

In 2007, approximately 38,000 people entered some form of substance abuse treatment in Washington State. Approximately 32,000 people of the people admitted were admitted for some sort of drug abuse. Many drugs have a significant presence in Washington state. Heroin, cocaine, and marijuana have long been major drugs, and all three of these have a strong presence in Washington. Meth is the relative newcomer, growing rapidly since it first began getting popular in the 1980s and 1990s. This article will not cover marijuana as it tends to be a much different issue than more destructive addictions such as heroin, cocaine, and meth addiction.

Heroin Addiction in Washington

Heroin abuse is a problem in Washington, but perhaps not as big a one as other parts of the nation. 2,495 people were admitted for heroin use in the state of Washington, making up ~6.5% of people admitted for substance abuse well below the national average of 13.6%. Heroin abuse is not concentrated in one particular area of Washington and is abused throughout the state.

Cocaine Addiction in Washington

2,163 people (5.7% of those admitted ) were admitted for smoking crack and another 763 (3.6%) went into treatment for snorting cocaine. Compared with the national averages of 9.4% and 3.7% this puts Washington’s cocaine abuse below the national average. However, cocaine is still available throughout Washington and is usually smuggled into Washington from Mexico, through California. Within Washington, crack cocaine is most commonly used in lower income urban areas while snorted cocaine is consumed by a more middle-class demographics.

Meth Addiction in Washington

In the state of Washington, meth / methamphetamine use is well above national averages. 6,378 people (16.7%) were admitted into facilities for amphetamine abuse, over twice the national average of 7.7%. Amphetamine abuse is still not as common in Washington as neighboring Oregon or California, but it is a relatively large problem within the state. Interestingly, since 2003 meth lab incidents in Washington have declined from 1,018 in 2003 to 122 in 2007. This indicates law enforcement’s crackdown on domestic meth labs. As local meth labs have been shut down, most of the drugs have been supplied by meth traffickers from Mexico. Meth also tends to be less of an urban drug, with most of the meth userbase located outside of major cities.